FAQs

  • Is my data safe and always available?

    Absolutely! Redis Enterprise Pro offers a comprehensive suite of high-availability provisions, including in-memory replication (within the same data center or across data centers), persistent storage on EBS and backups to S3 or any file server. Additional information can be found here.

  • How can I control access to my resources?

    Redis Enterprise Pro features the following access control mechanisms:

    • Password authentication
    • Source IP/Subnet ACL
    • Security Group ACL

    When deploying RCP on the same VPC as your application servers – we use a special set of AWS security permissions to limit access to only the instances required for running the RCP clusters. When deploying RCP on a different VPC from your application servers or under a different AWS account of yours – all the operational aspects of managing RCP are completely isolated from your application.

  • Are you fully compatible with open source Redis?

    Yes we are. Not only are we are the home of Redis, but most of Redis’ core engineers also work for Redis Labs! We contribute extensively to the open source Redis project. As a rule, we adhere to the open source’s specifications and make every effort to update our service with its latest versions.

    That said, the following Redis features are not applicable in the context of our service:

    • Shared databases aren’t supported in our service given their potential negative impact on performance. We recommend using dedicated databases instead (read this post for more information). Therefore, the following commands are blocked and will produce an error when invoked:
    • Data persistence and backups are managed from the service’s web interface, so the following commands are blocked:
    • Since replication is managed automatically by the service and since it could present a security risk, the following commands are blocked:
    • Redis Labs clustering technology is different than the open source Redis Cluster and supports clustering in a seamless manner that works with all standard Redis clients. As a result all Cluster related commands are blocked and will produce an error when invoked.
    • Commands that aren’t relevant for a hosted Redis service are blocked:
    • Additionally, only a subset of Redis’ configuration settings (via CONFIG GET/SET) is applicable to Redis Enterprise Cloud. Attempts to get or set a configuration parameter that isn’t included in the following list will result in an error:
      • hash-max-ziplist-entries
      • hash-max-ziplist-value
      • list-max-ziplist-entries
      • list-max-ziplist-value
      • notify-keyspace-events
      • set-max-intset-entries
      • slowlog-log-slower-than (value must be larger than 1000)
      • slowlog-max-len (value must be between 128 and 1024)
      • zset-max-ziplist-entries
      • zset-max-ziplist-value
    • Lastly, unlike Redis’ 512MB limit, the maximum size of key names in our service is 64KB (key values, however, can have sizes up to 512MB).
  • What are your payment schedule and terms?

    We charge at the beginning of each calendar month (around the 5th of the month) for the usage during the previous month. Usage is based on the size of the dataset (in GB) and its maximum throughput (in ops/sec). We accept all major credit cards.

  • Are you fully compatible with open source Redis?

    Yes we are. Not only are we are the home of Redis, but most of Redis’ core engineers also work for Redis Labs! We contribute extensively to the open source Redis project. As a rule, we adhere to the open source’s specifications and make every effort to update our service with its latest versions.

    That said, the following Redis features are not applicable in the context of our service:

    • Shared databases aren’t supported in our service given their potential negative impact on performance. We recommend using dedicated databases instead (read this post for more information). Therefore, the following commands are blocked and will produce an error when invoked:
    • Data persistence and backups are managed from the service’s web interface, so the following commands are blocked:
    • Since replication is managed automatically by the service and since it could present a security risk, the following commands are blocked:
    • Redis Labs clustering technology is different than the open source Redis Cluster and supports clustering in a seamless manner that works with all standard Redis clients. As a result all Cluster related commands are blocked and will produce an error when invoked.
    • Commands that aren’t relevant for a hosted Redis service are blocked:
    • Additionally, only a subset of Redis’ configuration settings (via CONFIG GET/SET) is applicable to Redis Enterprise Cloud. Attempts to get or set a configuration parameter that isn’t included in the following list will result in an error:
      • hash-max-ziplist-entries
      • hash-max-ziplist-value
      • list-max-ziplist-entries
      • list-max-ziplist-value
      • notify-keyspace-events
      • set-max-intset-entries
      • slowlog-log-slower-than (value must be larger than 1000)
      • slowlog-max-len (value must be between 128 and 1024)
      • zset-max-ziplist-entries
      • zset-max-ziplist-value
    • Lastly, unlike Redis’ 512MB limit, the maximum size of key names in our service is 64KB (key values, however, can have sizes up to 512MB).
  • What happens when my database fills up?

    As detailed in the open source Redis FAQ, under “What happens if Redis runs out of memory?”:

    • …[you] can use the “maxmemory” option in the config file to put a limit to the memory Redis can use. If this limit is reached Redis will start to reply with an error to write commands (but will continue to accept read-only commands), or you can configure it to evict keys when the max memory limit is reached in the case you are using Redis for caching.

    You can set the maxmemory value of each Redis Enterprise database in the management UI using the Memory limit property, as well as configure an eviction policy by setting it to any of the standard Redis behaviors, without interrupting database operations.

  • How many Redis databases can I create and manage?

    The number of databases is unlimited. The limiting factor is the available memory in the cluster, and the number of shards in the subscription. A shard is any provisioned database instance (master copy, slave copy or a database instance that is part of a clustered database).

    Note the impact of the specific database configuration on the number of shards it consumes. For example:

    • Enabling database replication, without enabling database clustering, creates two shards: a master shard and a slave shard.
    • Enabling database clustering creates as many database shards as you configure.
    • Enabling both database replication and database clustering creates double the number of database shards you configure.

Got more questions? We've got answers!Contact us!